10/25/2015

Non-Duality in Politics

In our new age metaphysics, we love to call ourselves "non-dualists," but in our politics, we are as stuck as ever in duality, in polarization, in the false dichotomy of "left" and "right."
Government is beautiful. Free enterprise is beautiful. In an enlightened society, the public and private sectors sustain and nourish each other. In an ignorant society, demagogues of the right and the left pit them against each other.
The role of good government is not to destroy free enterprise and make us all wards of the state, but to break up monopolies and too-big-to-fail banks, so that local entrepreneurs can thrive, provide diverse goods and services, and create real jobs.
I am as wary of those who dogmatize about the evils of capitalism as I am of those who dogmatize about the evils of government. Incidentally, the average size of an American corporation is less than 17 employees, including the largest multi-nationals. That means the vast majority of them are just 2 to 10 people working hard to provide a new product or service to their local community. They are the forgotten citizens in our politics of polarization.
But they are the children of the phoenix who will rise from the ashes of the old order. They will lead the way to a rebirth of local artist and artisan cooperatives, local energy producers, local farms, local publishers, local credit unions, local shamanic circles. The answer is neither the mega-monopoly nor the centralized government (which end up being the same entity) but the local entrepreneur, supporting, and supported by, the commonwealth.
But what do I know? In all my schooling and college, I was never taught a single course in how to start your own business. I doubt if any of my teachers would have known how to teach it.
Bring local business entrepreneurs into our classrooms and faculty meetings, to teach schools what skills we need to build economic freedom and self-sufficiency.
Just a Sunday morning thought. Have a radiant day. Better yet, be the radiance.

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